Concurrent Disorders - Mental Health

Concurrent disorder refers to any combination of addiction (drugs, eating disorder, alcoholism, etc...) existing at the same time as a mental health illness (anxiety, bipolar disorder, or a stress-related condition such as PTSD). One disorder can be more intense than the other - for example, a person can be experiencing severe mental health issues, but only mild alcoholism - or vice versa. How intense one disorder is does not depend on how intense the other one is. However, they are both present at the same time. Have you, or someone you know, been seeking treatment for an addiction without success? Or do you feel as though there could be more going on than just an addiction or mental health illness itself? Diagnosing BOTH conditions is necessary in order to gain proper treatment - often times an addiction can be identified, but if the underlying mental health issue isn’t also treated, it is much harder to achieve long-term recovery. Let us help you find a professional who is trained to evaluate the whole picture or resources within your community that can help with a complete diagnosis and treatment plan.

You are not alone. Connect with others who may be going through the same thing, find professional help and resources near you. The Kinjunxion community is here to help.

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Treating Concurrent Disorders

A Guide for Counsellors

Concurrent Substance Use and Mental Health Disorders

An Information Guide

A person with a mental health problem has a higher risk of having a substance use problem, just as a person with a substance use problem has an increased chance of having a mental health problem. This guide: explains the symptoms and causes of concurrent disorder outlines the different kinds of treatments available, including psychosocial and biological treatments describes integrated treatment and how it helps discusses recovery and relapse prevention discusses family involvement gives guidance on how to explain concurrent disorders to children This guide gives a thorough introduction to concurrent disorder treatment options, and sensitive and sound coping skills to help people with concurrent disorders - and their families - toward recovery."

A Family Guide to Concurrent Disorders

Having concurrent substance use and mental health problems obviously affects the person experiencing the problems directly, but they also have powerful effects on family members and friends. Families need help to deal with the impact of concurrent disorders, but families are also a key to finding effective solutions. Part I is an overview of concurrent disorders, an introduction to treatment options and information about substance use problems, mental health problems and how they interact. Part II focuses on the impact of concurrent disorders on family life. It includes information on self-care strategies for family members and understanding and coping with the effects of stigma. Part III explores treatment and support for people affected by concurrent disorders. It includes strategies for navigating the mental health and substance use treatment systems, information about psychosocial and medication treatment options, recognizing and planning for relapses, and anticipating and coping with crisis situations. Part IV talks about the journey to recovery.

Psychotherapy Essentials to Go: Motivational Interviewing for Concurrent Disorders

A quick-reference, multi-media guide to using Motivational Interviewing (MI) to treat co-occurring disorders. Addiction—whether to alcohol and drugs, sex, gambling, or Internet use—and mental health problems often go hand-in-hand. This concise book summarizes the key principles of a particular therapeutic approach to concurrent disorders, Motivational Interviewing (MI), which guides clients in eliciting and strengthening their desire for change. Laying out a four-stage treatment model—engagement, preparation, active treatment, and continuing care—the book walks readers through key facets of the therapeutic rapport at the heart of MI: working collaboratively on goals; connecting to the patient by understanding his or her strengths, needs, and concerns; and using the core MI skills of open questions, affirmations, reflections, and summaries (“OARS”). Readers are immersed in the spirit of MI through explanations and illustrations, preparing them for the practical challenges of therapeutic work with clients who suffer from addiction and mental health problems. Included in this comprehensive guide are a DVD of sample therapy sessions and clinical explication that describe how to implement the protocol, as well as a laminated pocket reminder card. An on-the-go package of practical tools that busy clinicians won’t want to be without. Please note that the ebook version of this title does not include the DVD.

The mentally ill chemical abuser

whose client?

Mentally ill chemical abusers have long been approached much as the elephant in the proverbial story of the blind men: practitioners in the fields of mental health, drug abuse, and alcohol abuse are apt to examine only the symptoms with which they are most familiar and make diagnoses from those. As the blind man holding the elephants tail was certain it was a piece of rope, the mental health practitioner faced with a MICA client might see only the mental illness and overlook an equally important need to treat the client's alcohol or drug dependence. The MICA population continues to grow for several reasons, including an increase in the number of homeless people; decreased funding for alcohol, drug, and mental health treatment; mental health hospital deinstitutionalization; and the rise in crack use. MICA - or dually diagnosed - clients invariably fall through the cracks of the standard treatment options for mental illness, alcohol abuse, and drug abuse, in large part because the systems often are uncoordinated. For example, since all use of "mood-altering substances" is forbidden to members of Alcoholics Anonymous, an alcohol-dependent schizophrenic would have to forego needed medication in order to attend AA meetings. At the same time, a client who is being treated for alcohol dependence might not find the anticipated lessening of depression after abstinence but may nevertheless be denied access to psychiatric assessment and antidepressant medication. In another case, psychiatric emergency workers might easily fail to identify drug ingestion as the cause for psychotic episodes in a chronic patient. It is not always the fault of misdiagnosis, however: MICA clients often manipulate mental health and alcohol and drug abuse professionals into fulfilling the need of the moment. A MICA client might appear one day as an alcohol abuser, the next as a drug addict, and the third as a mental patient in order to receive food, shelter and clothing. The Mentally Ill Chemical Abuser is the first book to close the gaps among the three systems and thereby help practitioners understand the complexities that interfere with progressive treatment of the MICA client. Cohen and Levy examine assessment issues and treatment planning problems that arise out of inaccurate assessment. They also give an integrated view of the client based on their own practical experience and offer solutions to issues associated with the MICA population. Any practitioner interested in the correlation between substance abuse and psychopathology will find this book's clear guidelines essential for better serving the mentally ill, chemical abusing patient.

Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders

The Evidence for Stigma Change

Estimates indicate that as many as 1 in 4 Americans will experience a mental health problem or will misuse alcohol or drugs in their lifetimes. These disorders are among the most highly stigmatized health conditions in the United States, and they remain barriers to full participation in society in areas as basic as education, housing, and employment. Improving the lives of people with mental health and substance abuse disorders has been a priority in the United States for more than 50 years. The Community Mental Health Act of 1963 is considered a major turning point in America's efforts to improve behavioral healthcare. It ushered in an era of optimism and hope and laid the groundwork for the consumer movement and new models of recovery. The consumer movement gave voice to people with mental and substance use disorders and brought their perspectives and experience into national discussions about mental health. However over the same 50-year period, positive change in American public attitudes and beliefs about mental and substance use disorders has lagged behind these advances. Stigma is a complex social phenomenon based on a relationship between an attribute and a stereotype that assigns undesirable labels, qualities, and behaviors to a person with that attribute. Labeled individuals are then socially devalued, which leads to inequality and discrimination. This report contributes to national efforts to understand and change attitudes, beliefs and behaviors that can lead to stigma and discrimination. Changing stigma in a lasting way will require coordinated efforts, which are based on the best possible evidence, supported at the national level with multiyear funding, and planned and implemented by an effective coalition of representative stakeholders. Ending Discrimination Against People with Mental and Substance Use Disorders: The Evidence for Stigma Change explores stigma and discrimination faced by individuals with mental or substance use disorders and recommends effective strategies for reducing stigma and encouraging people to seek treatment and other supportive services. It offers a set of conclusions and recommendations about successful stigma change strategies and the research needed to inform and evaluate these efforts in the United States.

Concurrent Mental Health and Substance Use Disorders

An Information Guide

A person with a mental health problem has a higher risk of having a substance use problem, just as a person with a substance use problem has an increased chance of having a mental health problem. This guide: explains the symptoms and causes of concurrent disorders outlines the different kinds of treatments available, including psychosocial and biological treatments describes integrated treatment and how it helps discusses recovery and relapse prevention discusses family involvement gives guidance on how to explain concurrent disorders to children This guide gives a thorough introduction to concurrent disorder treatment options, and sensitive and sound coping skills to help people with concurrent disorders - and their families - toward recovery.

Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5®)

This new edition of Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5®), used by clinicians and researchers to diagnose and classify mental disorders, is the product of more than 10 years of effort by hundreds of international experts in all aspects of mental health. Their dedication and hard work have yielded an authoritative volume that defines and classifies mental disorders in order to improve diagnoses, treatment, and research. The criteria are concise and explicit, intended to facilitate an objective assessment of symptom presentations in a variety of clinical settings -- inpatient, outpatient, partial hospital, consultation-liaison, clinical, private practice, and primary care. New features and enhancements make DSM-5® easier to use across all settings: The chapter organization reflects a lifespan approach, with disorders typically diagnosed in childhood (such as neurodevelopmental disorders) at the beginning of the manual, and those more typical of older adults (such as neurocognitive disorders) placed at the end. Also included are age-related factors specific to diagnosis. The latest findings in neuroimaging and genetics have been integrated into each disorder along with gender and cultural considerations. The revised organizational structure recognizes symptoms that span multiple diagnostic categories, providing new clinical insight in diagnosis. Specific criteria have been streamlined, consolidated, or clarified to be consistent with clinical practice (including the consolidation of autism disorder, Asperger's syndrome, and pervasive developmental disorder into autism spectrum disorder; the streamlined classification of bipolar and depressive disorders; the restructuring of substance use disorders for consistency and clarity; and the enhanced specificity for major and mild neurocognitive disorders). Dimensional assessments for research and validation of clinical results have been provided. Both ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM codes are included for each disorder, and the organizational structure is consistent with the new ICD-11 in development. The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, is the most comprehensive, current, and critical resource for clinical practice available to today's mental health clinicians and researchers of all orientations. The information contained in the manual is also valuable to other physicians and health professionals, including psychologists, counselors, nurses, and occupational and rehabilitation therapists, as well as social workers and forensic and legal specialists.

Substance Use Problems

A fully updated new edition of the popular text that separates the facts from the myths about drug and substance use and provides practical, evidence-based guidance on dealing with them. The literature on diagnosis and treatment of drug and substance abuse is filled with successful, empirically based approaches, but also with controversy and hearsay. Health professionals in a range of settings are bound to meet clients with troubles related to drugs – and this text helps them separate the myths from the facts. It provides trainees and professionals with a handy, concise guide for helping problem drug users build enjoyable, multifaceted lives using approaches based on decades of research. Readers will improve their intuitions and clinical skills by adding an overarching understanding of drug use and the development of problems that translates into appropriate techniques for encouraging clients to change behavior themselves. This highly readable text explains not only what to do, but when and how to do it. Seasoned experts and those new to the field will welcome the chance to review the latest developments in guiding self-change for this intriguing, prevalent set of problems.

Diagnosing and Treating Addictions

An Integrated Approach to Substance Use Disorders and Concurrent Disorders

An in-depth look at the disease of addiction and how to treat it. Diagnosing and Treating Addictions provides clinicians, counselors, doctors and families with a clear and concise understanding of substance use disorders. Written by a leading psychiatrist, Dr. Merville Vincent has over twenty years' experience treating addiction and concurrent mental health disorders. Based on the most recent research, Dr. Vincent guides you through the process of screening and diagnosing a patient with a substance use disorder all the way to the treatment phase. He explains different treatment options and therapies, including a detailed examination of residential rehabilitation. Dr. Vincent's expertise lies in concurrent mental health disorders and he explains how some of the most common disorders interact with addiction. Illustrated with case studies, Diagnosing and Treating Addictions contains everything professionals need to know to help those suffering with addiction. Topics include: What causes addiction? Pharmacology Screening methods for clinicians Behavioural addictions Withdrawal and detoxification An extensive section on concurrent disorders such as anxiety, depression, eating disorders and psychosis Treatment options and outcomes Hot topics such as prescription opiate addiction, medical marijuana and occupational addiction

All We Have to Fear

Psychiatry's Transformation of Natural Anxieties Into Mental Disorders

Argues that anxiety and fear are a part of everyone's life, and that the medical industry has created an epidemic out of over-diagnosing these conditions.

The Disorders

Specialty Articles from the Encyclopedia of Mental Health

The Disorders is a derivative volume of articles pulled from the award-winning Encyclopedia of Mental Health, providing A-to-Z coverage of the many disorders afflicting mental health patients, including alcohol problems, Alzheimer's disease, depression, epilepsy, gambling, obsessive-compulsive disorder, phobias, and suicide. According to 1990 estimates, mental disorders represent five of the ten leading causes of disability.* Among "developed" nations, including the United States, major depression is the leading cause of disability. Also near the top of these rankings are bipolar depression, alcohol dependence, schizophrenia, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. In addition, mental disorders are tragic contributors to mortality, with suicide perennially representing one of the leading preventable causes of death worldwide. The Disorders presents a comprehensive overview of the disorders afflicting mental health patients. It describes the impact of mental health on the individual and society and illustrates the factors that aid positive mental health. Thirty-five peer-reviewed articles written by more than 50 expert authors include essential material on specific disorders affecting modern society. Professionals and libraries will find this timely work indispensable.

Mental Health Counselors

Financial Health & Literacy

Mental Health Advocacy

Mental Health Peer Support

Eating Disorder Recovery

Mental Health Education

Mental Health Recovery

Health Conscious

Mental Health Issues

Exercise Mental Health

Halton Healthcare - Mental Health - Concurrent Disorders Program - Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital

Offers help to individuals who have a concurrent addiction and mental health issue

Services include:
  • assessment, consultation and treatment with an Addiction Psychiatrist
  • individual and group therapy
  • group based education focused on developing personal goals, skill building, and improving the management of mental health and addiction issues

St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton - Concurrent Disorders Program - West 5th Campus

The Outpatient Care Team is an extension of the inpatient service, and provides specialized concurrent disorder services for patients with both high addiction and high mental health needs.

Services include:
* Time-limited follow-up for stabilization and transition to community and/or other appropriate services
* Consultation with a Psychiatrist
* Group programming such as Structured Relapse Prevention, Maintaining Recovery, Women’s Self Esteem, Men’s Self Esteem
* 1 on 1 counselling for addictions and mental health using both a harm reduction and abstinence based approach

Joseph Brant Hospital - Community Mental Health Outpatient Services - Burlington - Joseph Brant Community Health Centre (Brant Centre)

Community Mental Health provides a continuum of care from assessment or consultation, to specialized treatment supports for clients with complex and serious mental health disorders.

Child and Adolescent Clinic (CAP)
Provides support to children/youth under the age of 18 years.
* Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist works with Social Worker to assess and provide treatment recommendations on complex cases.

Concurrent Disorders Clinic (Addictions & Mental Illness)
Specialized assessments of clients with co-occurring mental health and addictions disorders.
* psychiatrists work with Social Worker to identify clients who would benefit from longer term individual treatment.
* clinic staff also provide "Health & Hope Group," a 10-week psycho-educational support group for people who experience difficulties with both a mental health issue and substance abuse issue.

Early Intervention in Psychosis (Phoenix)
Regional clinical program provides service to clients 14-40 years of age experiencing a first episode of psychosis.
* jointly managed by Joseph Brant Hospital, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, North Halton Mental Health Clinic, ADAPT, and the Halton-Peel Schizophrenia Society.
* for more information, see separate listing here

General Psychiatrist Consultation Clinic
Assessment, medication review, and treatment recommendations via a "shared care" model with family physicians.
* follow up appointments provided as necessary for more complex cases to ensure the efficacy of medications prescribed and that the recommended treatment plan is working for the client.

Geriatric Psychiatric Consultation Service
Supports clients aged 65 and older who are residents of Burlington, for more details see separate listing here

Halton Homes (homelessness service)
Provides clinical support to Halton Homes service which targets mental health clients at risk of being homeless and provides both clinical case management and housing supports.
* Ontario Ministry of Health supportive housing initiative, lead agency is Summit Housing and Outreach Program.
* for more information see separate listings here

PACT (Program of Assertive Community Treatment)
Community outreach program of Halton Region, is housed at Joseph Brant serving all Halton residents, see separate listing here

PHAST (Prioritizing Health through Acute Stabilization and Treatment)
Access to mental health and addiction services for individuals 16 and older with mental health and/or addiction concerns who have an urgent need for acute stabilization and intervention
* multidisciplinary model, which includes the services of a registered nurse, addictions specialists, social workers, a child and youth intensive worker, a peer support worker, an occupational therapist, a transitional age youth social worker, a case manager and clerical support
* treatment includes stabilization and referral to social service agency partners through a combination of group and one-on-one sessions for individuals and their families

Treatment Services
Available through referral from a physician:
1. Short Term Treatment
Meets the needs of individuals who are experiencing mental health issues such as mood or anxiety disorders.
* assessment, psychiatric evaluation, treatment planning, skill development and coordination of community resources.
* an average of 12 therapy sessions is offered.
* clinicians also offer treatment via several groups, e.g. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for clients with depression or anxiety.

2. Intensive Case Management
Inter-professional team offers comprehensive outreach services to adult clients and their families.
* addresses the multiple needs of clients with predominantly psychotic or severe mood disorders (eg. bipolar) and focuses on the client's goals and effective community reintegration.

3. Medication Clinic
Operates with both RN and Psychiatrist support for the follow up of primarily a chronic population.
* goals are to facilitate the optimal use of psychotropic medications with a view to prevent/reduce hospitalizations and Emergency Department visits, ensure client stability in the community and support clients in maintaining adequate functioning and an enhanced quality of life.

St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton - Halton Seniors Mental Health Outreach Program - Burlington

A program providing specialized service to older adults with complex mental health and addiction needs

Clients may include seniors who have:
* behavioural disturbances or mental health problems associated with cognitive impairment
* mental health and/or addiction problems accompanied by significant medical illness or functional needs
* chronic mental illness who develop complicating age-related physical or mental health disorders
* late-onset severe mental illness
* the program involves specialists in geriatric psychiatry, nursing, social work, occupational therapy, and education
* outreach service available for those unable to access traditional services
* prospective clients require a family physician

The Halton program is also staffed with a seniors concurrent disorder worker through a local partnership with Halton Alcohol Drug and Gambling Assessment Prevention and Treatment Services (ADAPT)

The program also has staff called Psychogeriatric Resource Consultants (PRCs) who:
* provide a targeted educational and community development service and support for health providers
* provide education, facilitation and system support to staff in Long-Term Care facilities and staff of LTC funded community support agencies

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Group for Depression In the Older Adult:
* a variety of group and CBT strategies and skills are aimed at assisting seniors to reduce their level of depression and anxiety and develop coping strategies to manage symptoms

Joseph Brant Hospital - Community Mental Health Outpatient Services - Burlington - Joseph Brant Community Health Centre (Brant Centre)

Community Mental Health provides a continuum of care from assessment or consultation, to specialized treatment supports for clients with complex and serious mental health disorders.

Child and Adolescent Clinic (CAP)
Provides support to children/youth under the age of 18 years.
* Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist works with Social Worker to assess and provide treatment recommendations on complex cases.

Concurrent Disorders Clinic (Addictions & Mental Illness)
Specialized assessments of clients with co-occurring mental health and addictions disorders.
* psychiatrists work with Social Worker to identify clients who would benefit from longer term individual treatment.
* clinic staff also provide "Health & Hope Group," a 10-week psycho-educational support group for people who experience difficulties with both a mental health issue and substance abuse issue.

Early Intervention in Psychosis (Phoenix)
Regional clinical program provides service to clients 14-40 years of age experiencing a first episode of psychosis.
* jointly managed by Joseph Brant Hospital, Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital, North Halton Mental Health Clinic, ADAPT, and the Halton-Peel Schizophrenia Society.
* for more information, see separate listing here

General Psychiatrist Consultation Clinic
Assessment, medication review, and treatment recommendations via a "shared care" model with family physicians.
* follow up appointments provided as necessary for more complex cases to ensure the efficacy of medications prescribed and that the recommended treatment plan is working for the client.

Geriatric Psychiatric Consultation Service
Supports clients aged 65 and older who are residents of Burlington, for more details see separate listing here

Halton Homes (homelessness service)
Provides clinical support to Halton Homes service which targets mental health clients at risk of being homeless and provides both clinical case management and housing supports.
* Ontario Ministry of Health supportive housing initiative, lead agency is Summit Housing and Outreach Program.
* for more information see separate listings here

PACT (Program of Assertive Community Treatment)
Community outreach program of Halton Region, is housed at Joseph Brant serving all Halton residents, see separate listing here

PHAST (Prioritizing Health through Acute Stabilization and Treatment)
Access to mental health and addiction services for individuals 16 and older with mental health and/or addiction concerns who have an urgent need for acute stabilization and intervention
* multidisciplinary model, which includes the services of a registered nurse, addictions specialists, social workers, a child and youth intensive worker, a peer support worker, an occupational therapist, a transitional age youth social worker, a case manager and clerical support
* treatment includes stabilization and referral to social service agency partners through a combination of group and one-on-one sessions for individuals and their families

Treatment Services
Available through referral from a physician:
1. Short Term Treatment
Meets the needs of individuals who are experiencing mental health issues such as mood or anxiety disorders.
* assessment, psychiatric evaluation, treatment planning, skill development and coordination of community resources.
* an average of 12 therapy sessions is offered.
* clinicians also offer treatment via several groups, e.g. Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) for clients with depression or anxiety.

2. Intensive Case Management
Inter-professional team offers comprehensive outreach services to adult clients and their families.
* addresses the multiple needs of clients with predominantly psychotic or severe mood disorders (eg. bipolar) and focuses on the client's goals and effective community reintegration.

3. Medication Clinic
Operates with both RN and Psychiatrist support for the follow up of primarily a chronic population.
* goals are to facilitate the optimal use of psychotropic medications with a view to prevent/reduce hospitalizations and Emergency Department visits, ensure client stability in the community and support clients in maintaining adequate functioning and an enhanced quality of life.

St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton - Halton Seniors Mental Health Outreach Program - Burlington

A program providing specialized service to older adults with complex mental health and addiction needs

Clients may include seniors who have:
* behavioural disturbances or mental health problems associated with cognitive impairment
* mental health and/or addiction problems accompanied by significant medical illness or functional needs
* chronic mental illness who develop complicating age-related physical or mental health disorders
* late-onset severe mental illness
* the program involves specialists in geriatric psychiatry, nursing, social work, occupational therapy, and education
* outreach service available for those unable to access traditional services
* prospective clients require a family physician

The Halton program is also staffed with a seniors concurrent disorder worker through a local partnership with Halton Alcohol Drug and Gambling Assessment Prevention and Treatment Services (ADAPT)

The program also has staff called Psychogeriatric Resource Consultants (PRCs) who:
* provide a targeted educational and community development service and support for health providers
* provide education, facilitation and system support to staff in Long-Term Care facilities and staff of LTC funded community support agencies

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Group for Depression In the Older Adult:
* a variety of group and CBT strategies and skills are aimed at assisting seniors to reduce their level of depression and anxiety and develop coping strategies to manage symptoms

McMaster Children's Hospital - Pediatric Eating Disorders Program - Ron Joyce Children's Health Centre, Level 4

Provides comprehensive, multidisciplinary assessment for all new patients with eating problems on an in-patient, out-patient, day-treatment basis. Families and caregivers are integral to the treatment process. Further information is available from the National Eating Disorders Information Centre at 1-866-NEDIC-20 or www.nedic.ca

St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton - Halton Seniors Mental Health Outreach Program - Burlington

A program providing specialized service to older adults with complex mental health and addiction needs

Clients may include seniors who have:
* behavioural disturbances or mental health problems associated with cognitive impairment
* mental health and/or addiction problems accompanied by significant medical illness or functional needs
* chronic mental illness who develop complicating age-related physical or mental health disorders
* late-onset severe mental illness
* the program involves specialists in geriatric psychiatry, nursing, social work, occupational therapy, and education
* outreach service available for those unable to access traditional services
* prospective clients require a family physician

The Halton program is also staffed with a seniors concurrent disorder worker through a local partnership with Halton Alcohol Drug and Gambling Assessment Prevention and Treatment Services (ADAPT)

The program also has staff called Psychogeriatric Resource Consultants (PRCs) who:
* provide a targeted educational and community development service and support for health providers
* provide education, facilitation and system support to staff in Long-Term Care facilities and staff of LTC funded community support agencies

Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT) Group for Depression In the Older Adult:
* a variety of group and CBT strategies and skills are aimed at assisting seniors to reduce their level of depression and anxiety and develop coping strategies to manage symptoms

Halton Healthcare - Mental Health - Eating Disorders Clinic - Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital

Provides services for youth and adults struggling with eating disorders, including anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa * helps to eliminate or reduce symptoms of their eating disorder and develop adaptive strategies * as a member of Central West Eating Disorder Program (CWEDP), the team works in partnership with Treillis Mental Health and Developmental Services, Trillium Health Partners and William Osler Health System

Services include:
  • psychiatric assessment and treatment
  • individual, group and family counselling
  • nutritional assessment and counselling
  • family support and education

St. Joseph's Healthcare Hamilton - Seniors Mental Health Unit - West 5th Campus, Harbour East Unit, Level 1, Block E

A 12 bed assessment and treatment unit providing a therapeutic environment to those whose recovery from psychiatric disease is complicated by age-related issues. Programs available are most appropriate for those who present primarily with mood disorders and late-onset psychotic disorders.

Canadian Mental Health Association - Equilibrium Mood Disorder Support Group, Oakville - Evangel Pentecostal Church - Oakville - Evangel Pentecostal Church

A peer support group for individuals and their families who are affected by a mood disorder and whose main purpose is to gain a better understanding of the illness, to offer non-judgmental support and to share experiences

The focus of monthly meetings is wellness through education and sharing
  • guest speakers include individuals who live with a mood disorder, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurses, social workers and specialists in nutrition and relaxation
  • video presentations by medical specialists or professional documentaries
  • open discussions
  • no registration or membership required
  • all those affected by a mood disorder are welcome
  • refer to the Mental Health Services offered by the Canadian Mental Health Association, Halton Branch for more information

Joseph Brant Hospital - Community Mental Health Outpatient Services - Phoenix Program Early Intervention Service for Psychosis - Burlington - Joseph Brant Community Health Centre (Brant Centre)

The Phoenix Program is a mental health outpatient, community based program for Halton residents age 14 to 35 who are experiencing early stages of psychosis
* clinical partnership between Halton Healthcare, Joseph Brant Hospital, North Halton Mental Health Clinic, ADAPT and the Schizophrenia Society of Ontario

Services include:
* rapid psychiatric assessment
* treatment based on individual concerns/goals including education about psychosis
* assistance with work, school, social and leisure activities
* specialized support to family and friends
* addictions counselling
* community program referral and illness management instruction after discharge